Attorney Alan G. Peyrouton

NJ Criminal Lawyers

Attorney Alan G. Peyrouton is from Ridgewood, NJ.

After graduating from Ridgewood High School, Mr. Peyrouton accepted an athletic scholarship to attend Saint Peter’s University, where he earned his Bachelor of Science Degree in International Business. Upon graduation, he competed on the International Tennis Federation (ITF) Circuit. Soon after retiring from tennis, he pursued his passion for law at Michigan State University (Go Spartans!).

After earning his Juris Doctorate in 2002 from MSU, Mr. Peyrouton had the honor of serving as a law clerk for the Honorable Lawrence Glazer (30th Judicial Circuit Court of Michigan).

In 2003, Mr. Peyrouton relocated to the nation’s capital, Washington, D.C., where he worked for the United States Department of Justice, Civil Rights Division, Housing and Civil Enforcement.

In 2009, Mr. Peyrouton returned to his native New Jersey and opened a private practice devoted to Criminal Defense.

He quickly became a Top-Rated Criminal Defense Lawyer in New Jersey.

Mr. Peyrouton has represented clients before the following courts:

United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit;

New Jersey Supreme Court, New Jersey Superior Court, and New Jersey Municipal Court.

He has represented countless clients in virtually every type of matter, ranging from Simple Assault to Aggravated Sexual Assault.

His experience extends to both bench and jury trials.

Mr. Peyrouton has been a proud member of the following organizations:


Peyrouton is also an author.

The New Jersey Law Journal has published many of his articles in the areas of criminal law & immigration.

Below are some of his more popular articles.

Recent Blog Posts

Arrest Warrants

Arrest Warrants: Jail Is A Matter Of Time

Arrest warrants: Not the kind of surprise you want! Not all surprises are good, especially when connected to arrest warrants against you. Imagine seeing blue

NJ SORA

NJ SORA License: Comprehensive Guide

NJ SORA licenses are necessary if you intend to pursue a career as a security guard. You must be licensed to become an armed security

A person extorts if he purposely threatens to:

a. Inflict bodily injury on or physically confine or restrain anyone or commit any other criminal offense;
b. Accuse anyone of an offense or cause charges of an offense to be instituted against any person;
c. Expose or publicize any secret or any asserted fact, whether true or false, tending to subject any person to hatred, contempt or ridicule, or to impair his credit or business repute;
d. Take or withhold action as an official, or cause an official to take or withhold action;
e. Bring about or continue a strike, boycott or other collective action, if the property is not demanded or received for the benefit of the group in whose interest the actor purports to act;
f. Testify or provide information or withhold testimony or information with respect to another’s legal claim or defense; or
g. Inflict any other harm which would not substantially benefit the actor but which is calculated to materially harm another person.

***It is an affirmative defense to prosecution based on paragraphs b, c, d or f that the property obtained was honestly claimed as restitution or indemnification for harm done in the circumstances or as lawful compensation for property or services.

Reasonable Articulable Suspicion

Reasonable suspicion is a “search” standard that applies in criminal law.

When a police officer conducts a warrantless search, and does not have probable cause to justify the search, the courts look to see if the police had
a “reasonable & articulable suspicion” for the search.

A mere “hunch” is not enough.

In other words, a police officer has to provide an acceptable explanation for the search.

United States Constitution

Amendment IV

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

NJSA - 2C:43-7.2.
Eligibility for parole;
persons convicted of certain violent crimes

a. A court imposing a sentence of incarceration for a crime of the first or second degree enumerated in subsection d. of this section shall fix a minimum term of 85% of the sentence imposed, during which the defendant shall not be eligible for parole.


b. The minimum term required by subsection a. of this section shall be fixed as a part of every sentence of incarceration imposed upon every conviction of a crime enumerated in subsection d. of this section, whether the sentence of incarceration is determined pursuant to N.J.S.2C:43-6, N.J.S.2C:43-7, N.J.S.2C:11-3 or any other provision of law, and shall be calculated based upon the sentence of incarceration actually imposed. The provisions of subsection a. of this section shall not be construed or applied to reduce the time that must be served before eligibility for parole by an inmate sentenced to a mandatory minimum period of incarceration. Solely for the purpose of calculating the minimum term of parole ineligibility pursuant to subsection a. of this section, a sentence of life imprisonment shall be deemed to be 75 years.


c. Notwithstanding any other provision of law to the contrary and in addition to any other sentence imposed, a court imposing a minimum period of parole ineligibility of 85 percent of the sentence pursuant to this section shall also impose a five-year term of parole supervision if the defendant is being sentenced for a crime of the first degree, or a three-year term of parole supervision if the defendant is being sentenced for a crime of the second degree. The term of parole supervision shall commence upon the completion of the sentence of incarceration imposed by the court pursuant to subsection a. of this section unless the defendant is serving a sentence of incarceration for another crime at the time he completes the sentence of incarceration imposed pursuant to subsection a., in which case the term of parole supervision shall commence immediately upon the defendant’s release from incarceration. During the term of parole supervision the defendant shall remain in release status in the community in the legal custody of the Commissioner of the Department of Corrections and shall be supervised by the State Parole Board as if on parole and shall be subject to the provisions and conditions

Felony Degree

Prison & Fines

Examples

First-Degree

1st-degree felony charges in NJ are reserved for the most serious criminal offenses. Prison terms start at a minimum of 10 years in prison.

Second-Degree

2nd-degree felony charges carry 5-10 yrs in prison.
These charges can often be “downgraded” to 3rd or 4th-degree crimes.

Third-Degree

3rd-degree felony charges carry 3-5 years.
You have a good shot at PTI if you are charged with a 3rd-degree.

Fourth-Degree

4th-degree felony charges carry up to 18 months in jail. These cases can get “remanded” to a lower court. In this way, you will be out of “felony” danger.