New Jersey Traffic Lawyers

Our Approach

As Traffic Lawyers in New Jersey, we are committed to fighting for you. You will benefit from our extensive experience.
Most importantly, we will be honest about your chances of winning your case. We never guarantee results. However, we absolutely guarantee that we will aggressively fight for you!

The best traffic lawyers are able to reduce your points or get them completely dismissed.

When you hire us, you will get complete access to us. We respond to all communications & really care about our clients. Our fees are reasonable and we offer payment plans. 

Table of Contents

New Jersey Traffic Ticket Lawyer Services:

(NJSA 39:4-97) - Careless Driving in New Jersey

Penalties for Careless Driving in New Jersey

Points: Two points are assessed on your NJ license if you get a conviction for careless driving.

Fine: Fines range between $50 and $200 if you’re convicted of careless driving in New Jersey.

Court costs: Municipal courts in New Jersey assess approximately $33 in court fees.

Surcharge: If you get six points or more on your license in New Jersey over three years must pay a surcharge.
This fee is separate from the fine & court costs.
This surcharge is paid to the NJ Motor Vehicle Commission (MVC).

Please note: A point-induced surcharge costs $150.

Auto insurance increase: If you get a careless driving conviction in New Jersey, your insurance can go up.

Jail time: It rarely happens but you may face up to15 days in jail if you are convicted of careless driving.
This depends on the judge and the specific facts of your case.

This is where you may want to get a traffic lawyer.

(NJSA 39:4-96) Reckless Driving in New Jersey

Penalties for Reckless Driving in New Jersey

Points: Five points are assessed on your NJ license if you get a conviction for reckless driving.

Fine: Fines range between $50 and $200 if you’re convicted of reckless driving in New Jersey. A second offense may result in a fine between $100 and $500.

Court costs: Municipal courts in New Jersey assess approximately $33 in court fees.

Surcharge: If you get six points or more on your license in New Jersey over three years must pay a surcharge. This fee is separate from the fine & court costs. This surcharge is paid to the NJ Motor Vehicle Commission (MVC).

Please note: A point-induced surcharge costs $150.

Auto insurance increase: If you get a reckless driving conviction in New Jersey, your insurance can go up.

Jail time: It rarely happens but you may face 60 days in jail if you are convicted of reckless driving. If it is your second offense you may face up to 90 days in jail.

This depends on the judge and the specific facts of your case.

Retaining a traffic lawyer is a good idea.

(NJSA 39:4-98) Speeding in New Jersey

So, you got a ticket for speeding. The ticket says you were going 90 in a 55. In addition to a fine, you are facing five points on your license, and maybe even jail time. It does not look good. You may want to consider hiring a lawyer to help you.

Driving over the speed limit is taken seriously in New Jersey. And the faster you are driving, the more serious are the penalties. If you plead guilty or are found guilty after a trial, you will pay a fine and court costs, have points placed on your license, and possibly have your driver’s license suspended, and even be ordered to serve jail time.

And if the violation was on a roadway where the speed limit is 65 miles per hour, and in a construction zone or safe corridor, the fines are double.

The Motor Vehicle Commission of New Jersey (MVC) attaches either two, four, or five points to speeding tickets.:

If you are driving 1 to 14 miles per hour above the speed limit, your ticket will carry 2 points.

If you are driving 15 to 29 miles per hour above the speed limit, your ticket will carry 4 points.

If you are driving 30 or more miles per hour above the speed limit, your ticket will carry 5 points.

Points matter because if you get too many points on your license, you will pay a surcharge to the MVC, your driving privileges will be suspended, and your insurance rates may go up.

If you get six points or more on your license in New Jersey over three years you must pay a surcharge.
This fee is separate from any fine or court costs.
And if you get twelve or more points on your license in a two year period, your license will be suspended.

Besides any fines and points, courts may impose up to 15 days in jail following a conviction for speeding, and/or suspend your license.

As traffic lawyers, we know the court system, and how best to handle these matters.

Give us a call or fill out a FREE Consultation form.

(NJSA 39:6B-2) Driving in New Jersey without Insurance

Penalties for Driving Without Insurance in New Jersey First Offense: Fine: Fines range between $300 and $1,000 if you’re convicted of driving without insurance in New Jersey. Court costs: Municipal courts in New Jersey assess approximately $33 in court fees. Loss of License: One year loss of driving privileges from the date of conviction. Second Offense: Fine: If you are convicted for a second or subsequent offense of driving without insurance your fine will be up to $5,000. Court costs: Municipal courts in New Jersey assess approximately $33 in court fees. Loss of License: Two years loss of driving privileges from the date of conviction for a second or subsequent conviction. Jail time: If you are convicted for a second or subsequent offense of driving without insurance you will be sentenced to 14 days in jail. Community Service: If you are convicted for a second or subsequent offense of driving without insurance you will be sentenced to 30 days community service. Additional penalties: Surcharge: If you are convicted of driving without insurance in New Jersey you must pay a $250 surcharge year for three years.
This fee is separate from the fine & court costs.
This surcharge is paid to the NJ Motor Vehicle Commission (MVC). Auto insurance increase: If you are convicted for driving without insurance in New Jersey, your insurance can go up.

(NJSA 39:3-40) Driving While Suspended in New Jersey

Penalties for Driving While Suspended in New Jersey

First Offense:

Fine: Fine is $500 if you’re convicted of driving while suspended in New Jersey.

Court costs: Municipal courts in New Jersey assess approximately $33 in court fees.

Loss of License: your license will be suspended up to 6 months from the date of conviction.

Second Offense:

Fine: If you are convicted for a second offense of driving while suspended your fine will be $750.

Court costs: Municipal courts in New Jersey assess approximately $33 in court fees.

Loss of License: your license will be suspended up to 6 months from the date of conviction.

Jail time: If you are convicted for a second offense of driving while suspended you will be sentenced from 1 to 5 days in jail.

Third Offense:

Fine: If you are convicted for a third or subsequent offense of driving while suspended your fine will be $1,000.

Court costs: Municipal courts in New Jersey assess approximately $33 in court fees.

Loss of License: your license will be suspended up to 6 months from the date of conviction.

Jail time: If you are convicted for a third or subsequent offense of driving while suspended you will be sentenced to 10 days in jail.

Warning! In addition to the penalties above, you will be subject to “enhanced” penalties if your license is suspended for driving while intoxicated, or for driving without insurance, or a number of other reasons. These enhanced penalties can include mandatory  jail sentences of up to 6 months,  up to a 30 month license suspension, and additional fines.

Additional penalties:

Vehicle Registration: Depending on the circumstances your vehicle registration may also be suspended.

Surcharge: If you are convicted of driving while suspended in New Jersey you must pay a $250 surcharge year for three years. This fee is separate from the fine & court costs. This surcharge is paid to the NJ Motor Vehicle Commission (MVC).

Auto insurance increase: If you are convicted for driving while suspended in New Jersey, your insurance can go up.

 

(NJSA 39:4-49.1) Drug Possession in a Motor Vehicle

Penalties for Drug/Controlled Dangerous Substance Possession by an Operator of a Motor Vehicle in New Jersey?

Loss of License: If you are convicted of driving a motor vehicle while knowingly having drugs in your possession or drugs in your car, you will lose your driving privileges for two years from the date of conviction.

Fine: If you’re convicted your fine will be not less than $50.

Court costs: Municipal courts in New Jersey assess approximately $33 in court fees.

Auto insurance increase: If you get convicted for operating a motor vehicle while in possession of a controlled dangerous substance in New Jersey, your insurance can go up.

Note: This ticket is usually accompanied by a criminal complaint for Drug Possession like marijuana.
Drug convictions ruin lives. If you get a drug conviction, you will not be able to get a job and you may get kicked out of school.
Call us now, we’re here to protect you.

Click here for more on Possession While Operating a Motor Vehicle.

(NJSA 39:8-18) Affixing an inspection approval sticker without a reinspection

Penalties for affixing an inspection sticker without a reinspection in New Jersey

Fine: First offense fines range between $1,000 and $1,500. Subsequent offense fines range between $2,000 and $3,500.

Court costs: Municipal courts in New Jersey assess approximately $33 in court fees.

License suspension: If convicted of NJSA 39:8-18 your driver’s license will be suspended for a period of at least one year but not more than three. If convicted of a second or subsequent time, your license will be permanently revoked.

This is where you may want to get a traffic lawyer. You may benefit from having someone who knows the system and has the talent to enable you to keep your license.

(NJSA 39:8-1) Failure to Inspect in New Jersey

Penalties for Failure to Inspect in New Jersey

Fine: The fines for failure to inspect your vehicle range between $100 and $200.

Court costs: Municipal courts in New Jersey assess approximately $33 in court fees.

Jail time: It rarely happens but you may face up to 30 days in jail if you are failure to inspect.
This depends on the judge and the specific facts of your case.

2-Point Tickets in New Jersey

Nobody likes getting a traffic ticket. After all, when you get a ticket, you lose money.
Not only do you get a fine, but you get points on your license.

So, what are points?
The Motor Vehicle Commission of New Jersey (MVC) has a system that attaches different points to different violations.
Most violations will carry either two, four, or five points.
The more serious violations carry more points.
Some common two-point tickets include:

39:4-36       Failure to yield to a pedestrian in a crosswalk

39:4-57       Failure to observe the direction of an officer

39:4-81       Failure to observe traffic signals

39:4-82       Failure to keep right

39:4-85.1    Wrong way on a one-way street

39:4-88       Failure to observe traffic lanes

39:4-97       Careless driving

39:4-127     Improper backing or turning in street

39:4-144     Failure to stop or yield

Points matter because if you get too many points on your license, you will pay a surcharge to the MVC, your driving privileges will be suspended, and your insurance rates may go up.
If you get six points or more on your license in New Jersey over three years you must pay a surcharge.
This fee is separate from any fine or court costs. And if you get twelve or more points on your license in a two year period, your license will be suspended.

When you hire us, we look at all the possible defenses to the charge. Every case is different.
For example, judges look at things like your age; is your license a commercial driver’s license or a regular driver’s license; was the interaction between you and the officer courteous; your driving history (driver’s abstract).

In court, we meet with the prosecutor, and vigorously argue on your behalf. 

As defense counsel, he has been to courts in every county in New Jersey. We know the court system, and how best to handle these matters. Our objective is to get the best possible result for you.

(NJSA 39:4-144) Failure to Stop or Yield in New Jersey

Penalties for Failure to Stop or Yield in New Jersey

Points: Two points are assessed on your NJ license if you get a conviction for failure to stop at a stop sign or yield at a yield sign.

Fine: Fines range between $50 and $200 if you’re convicted of failure to stop or yield.

Court costs: Municipal courts in New Jersey assess approximately $33 in court fees.

Surcharge: If you get six points or more on your license in New Jersey over three years must pay a surcharge. This fee is separate from the fine & court costs. This surcharge is paid to the NJ Motor Vehicle Commission (MVC).

Please note: A point-induced surcharge costs $150.

Auto insurance increase: If you get a failure to stop at a stop sign or yield at a yield sign conviction in New Jersey, your insurance can go up.

Jail time: It rarely happens but you may face15 days in jail if you are convicted of failure to stop or yield.
This depends on the judge and the specific facts of your case.

Remember: A “rolling stop” is not a “complete stop”. The law requires a driver to come to a “complete stop” at a stop sign. I know you might be in a hurry, but the cop will not care that you are late for your appointment.

Racing on a Highway in New Jersey

Penalties for Racing on a Highway in New Jersey

Points: Two points are assessed on your NJ license if you get a racing on a highway conviction for careless driving.

Fine: For a first offense, fines range between $25 and $100 if you’re convicted of racing on a highway in New Jersey. For a second offense, the fines range between $100 and $200.

Court costs: Municipal courts in New Jersey assess approximately $33 in court fees.
DMV Surcharge: If you get six points or more on your license in New Jersey over three years must pay a surcharge.
This fee is separate from the fine & court costs.
This surcharge is paid to the NJ Motor Vehicle Commission (MVC).

Please note: A point-induced surcharge costs $150.

Auto insurance increase: If you get a racing on a highway conviction in New Jersey your insurance can go up.

Suspended License: If you are convicted of racing on a highway the court may suspend your driver’s license.

This is where you may want to get a traffic lawyer.

5-Point Tickets in New Jersey

So, you got a ticket. You go online and see that it carries five points. You ask, what do five points mean to me?

The Motor Vehicle Commission of New Jersey (MVC) has a system that attaches different points to different violations. Most violations will carry either two, four, or five points. The more serious violations carry more points. Some common five point tickets include:

39:4-52       Racing on highway

39:4-84       Failure to pass to right of vehicle proceeding in opposite direction

39:4-89       Tailgating

39:4-96       Reckless driving

39:4-98       Speeding by 30 mph or more over the speed limit

39:4-128.1  Improper passing of school bus

39:4-97       Careless driving

39:4-127     Improper backing or turning in street

39:4-144     Failure to stop or yield

Points matter because if you get too many points on your license, you will pay a surcharge to the MVC, your driving privileges will be suspended, and your insurance rates may go up. If you get six points or more on your license in New Jersey over three years you must pay a surcharge.
This fee is separate from any fine or court costs.
And if you get twelve or more points on your license in a two year period, your license will be suspended.

When you hire us, we look at all the possible defenses to the charge.
A lot plays into how your case is resolved. For example, your age; is your license a commercial driver’s license or a regular driver’s license; was the interaction between you and the officer courteous; your driving history (driver’s abstract).

In court, we meet with the prosecutor, and vigorously argue on your behalf.  We know the court system, and how best to handle these matters.
Our objective is to get the best possible result for you, the client.

(NJSA 39:4-88b) Unsafe Lane Change in New Jersey

Penalties for Unsafe Lane Change in New Jersey

Points: Unsafe lane change tickets carry two points on your NJ license. We’re here to help people.

Fine: Fines range between $50 and $200 if you’re convicted of unsafe lane change in New Jersey.

Court costs: Municipal courts in New Jersey assess approximately $33 in court fees.

Surcharge: If you get six points or more on your license in New Jersey over three years must pay a surcharge. This fee is separate from the fine & court costs. This surcharge is paid to the NJ Motor Vehicle Commission (MVC).

Please note: A point-induced surcharge costs $150.

Auto insurance increase: If you get an unsafe lane change conviction in New Jersey, your insurance can go up.

Jail time: It rarely happens but you may face15 days in jail if you are convicted of careless driving.
This depends on the judge and the specific facts of your case.

(NJSA 39:4-89) Tailgating in New Jersey

Penalties for Tailgating (following a vehicle too closely) in New Jersey

Points: Five points are assessed on your NJ license if you get a conviction for tailgating.

Fine: Fines range between $50 and $200 if you’re convicted of tailgating.

Court costs: Municipal courts in New Jersey assess approximately $33 in court fees.

Surcharge: If you get six points or more on your license in New Jersey over three years must pay a surcharge. This fee is separate from the fine & court costs. This surcharge is paid to the NJ Motor Vehicle Commission (MVC).

Please note: A point-induced surcharge costs $150.

Auto insurance increase: If you get a tailgating conviction in New Jersey, your insurance can go up.

Jail time: It rarely happens but you may face15 days in jail if you are convicted of tailgating.
This depends on the judge and the specific facts of your case.

License suspension: The judge who hears your case may suspend your driver’s license depending on the facts of your case.

A person extorts if he purposely threatens to:

a. Inflict bodily injury on or physically confine or restrain anyone or commit any other criminal offense;
b. Accuse anyone of an offense or cause charges of an offense to be instituted against any person;
c. Expose or publicize any secret or any asserted fact, whether true or false, tending to subject any person to hatred, contempt or ridicule, or to impair his credit or business repute;
d. Take or withhold action as an official, or cause an official to take or withhold action;
e. Bring about or continue a strike, boycott or other collective action, if the property is not demanded or received for the benefit of the group in whose interest the actor purports to act;
f. Testify or provide information or withhold testimony or information with respect to another’s legal claim or defense; or
g. Inflict any other harm which would not substantially benefit the actor but which is calculated to materially harm another person.

***It is an affirmative defense to prosecution based on paragraphs b, c, d or f that the property obtained was honestly claimed as restitution or indemnification for harm done in the circumstances or as lawful compensation for property or services.

Reasonable Articulable Suspicion

Reasonable suspicion is a “search” standard that applies in criminal law.

When a police officer conducts a warrantless search, and does not have probable cause to justify the search, the courts look to see if the police had
a “reasonable & articulable suspicion” for the search.

A mere “hunch” is not enough.

In other words, a police officer has to provide an acceptable explanation for the search.

United States Constitution

Amendment IV

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

NJSA - 2C:43-7.2.
Eligibility for parole;
persons convicted of certain violent crimes

a. A court imposing a sentence of incarceration for a crime of the first or second degree enumerated in subsection d. of this section shall fix a minimum term of 85% of the sentence imposed, during which the defendant shall not be eligible for parole.


b. The minimum term required by subsection a. of this section shall be fixed as a part of every sentence of incarceration imposed upon every conviction of a crime enumerated in subsection d. of this section, whether the sentence of incarceration is determined pursuant to N.J.S.2C:43-6, N.J.S.2C:43-7, N.J.S.2C:11-3 or any other provision of law, and shall be calculated based upon the sentence of incarceration actually imposed. The provisions of subsection a. of this section shall not be construed or applied to reduce the time that must be served before eligibility for parole by an inmate sentenced to a mandatory minimum period of incarceration. Solely for the purpose of calculating the minimum term of parole ineligibility pursuant to subsection a. of this section, a sentence of life imprisonment shall be deemed to be 75 years.


c. Notwithstanding any other provision of law to the contrary and in addition to any other sentence imposed, a court imposing a minimum period of parole ineligibility of 85 percent of the sentence pursuant to this section shall also impose a five-year term of parole supervision if the defendant is being sentenced for a crime of the first degree, or a three-year term of parole supervision if the defendant is being sentenced for a crime of the second degree. The term of parole supervision shall commence upon the completion of the sentence of incarceration imposed by the court pursuant to subsection a. of this section unless the defendant is serving a sentence of incarceration for another crime at the time he completes the sentence of incarceration imposed pursuant to subsection a., in which case the term of parole supervision shall commence immediately upon the defendant’s release from incarceration. During the term of parole supervision the defendant shall remain in release status in the community in the legal custody of the Commissioner of the Department of Corrections and shall be supervised by the State Parole Board as if on parole and shall be subject to the provisions and conditions

Felony Degree

Prison & Fines

Examples

First-Degree

1st-degree felony charges in NJ are reserved for the most serious criminal offenses. Prison terms start at a minimum of 10 years in prison.

Second-Degree

2nd-degree felony charges carry 5-10 yrs in prison.
These charges can often be “downgraded” to 3rd or 4th-degree crimes.

Third-Degree

3rd-degree felony charges carry 3-5 years.
You have a good shot at PTI if you are charged with a 3rd-degree.

Fourth-Degree

4th-degree felony charges carry up to 18 months in jail. These cases can get “remanded” to a lower court. In this way, you will be out of “felony” danger.